The Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) is a small to medium-sized freshwater crocodile native to Indonesia (Borneo and possibly Java), Brunei, East Malaysia, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. The species is critically endangered and already extirpated from many regions. Its other common names include Siamese freshwater crocodile, Singapore small-grain, and soft-belly. Wikipedia

Chhay Areng rangers (Siamese Crocodile Station) were called by villagers to remove a wild crocodile who was living close to their homes. The villagers were scared that the crocodile would put their animals in danger. Wildlife Alliance rangers found the crocodile in good health and they decided to release him upon Sre Ambel River, far from the community area.

The Siamese crocodile is a Critically Endangered species worldwide. They are mainly hunted for their skins but also for their eggs. Another major threat is habitat loss mainly from sand dragging and hydroelectric dams which are highly destructive to their habitat.

Wildlife Alliance has preserved vital habitats for this critically endangered species. We recently helped stop the construction of a hydroelectric dam in Chhay Areng valley and have ensured the area will stay protected by opening a new ranger station and increased our presence on the ground. This will help preserve Cambodia’s Siamese crocodile population.

SPONSOR A RANGER STATION
FORESTS PROTECTION PROGRAM

Our forest rangers work tirelessly to protect some of the world’s most endangered animals in one of Southeast Asia’s last great rainforests.

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