Forests

Wildlife Alliance takes action on the ground to protect tropical rainforests. We provide measurable results in preserving large continuous tracts of rainforest cover for long-range movement of large mammals; in protecting watershed ecosystem function for water supply and climate regulation; and in maintaining forestland for indigenous communities.

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save tigers

Tigers are on the brink of extinction. Only an estimated 3,200 tigers are surviving in the wild today. The World Bank’s Global Tiger Initiative (GTI) Assessment has identified that the main cause for loss of tigers is weak law enforcement on the ground. 

Wildlife Alliance is working with the Cambodian government to prepare for a tiger recovery program, focusing on strong law enforcement to protect tiger habitat and ensure a healthy prey base, working with local communities to develop ecotourism, and conducting systematic camera trap surveys to inventory the ungulate prey base in the area. 

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wildlife trafficking

The illegal wildlife trade is a $19 billion dollar black market, having decimated wildlife species in 84 countries, driven by the rising demand for exotic pets, luxury wild meat and traditional medicine. This lucrative business does not benefit local communities, but only a handful of kingpins who earn profits from the high price of endangered and near-extinct animals. Wildlife Alliance takes action directly on the ground, intercepting illegal shipments and rescuing smuggled animals with its Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team, a counter trafficking unit that received the 2015 United Nations Environmental Program Asia Environmental Enforcement Award.

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rescue & care

The overriding goal of every wildlife rescue operation is to be able to rehabilitate and release rescued animals back into the wild. We provide veterinary care at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center for wounded animals. Those animals that have fully recovered and are ready at life in the wild once again are released back into the wild under IUCN protocols at one of our three release sites.

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Livelihoods

We work with poor farmers who have no other subsistence means than forest slash and burn and wildlife poaching. Because the carrying capacity of the rainforest can no longer support the growing population of these farmers, Wildlife Alliance helps them plan and develop new jobs. Our goal is to help them earn enough income so they can exit poverty and no longer need to destroy the rainforest for survival. We teach small business management, modern farming, and basic infrastructure techniques for adaptation to climate change.  An example of our alternative job development is Chi Phat village in the Cardamoms, where families have stopped forest slash and burn practices and are now earning sustainable income from international tourism. 

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Education

Wildlife Alliance brings environmental education to school children, teachers and adults in rural communities.  To date, the mobile education team has reached over 200,000 people across the country, fostering positive behavior changes towards environmental sustainability. This education awareness has engaged civil participation in calling our Hotline, with over 1,000 calls in 2014.

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